Eating certain types of fruits, such as grapes, blueberries and apples can greatly reduce the chance of getting diabetes, according to a study. Researchers from Harvard, however, found out that drinking fruit juice can increase the risk.

Eating apples, grapes and blueberries can cut your risk of type 2 diabetes, but drinking more fruit juice can increase your risk, according to researchers from the United States, Singapore and the United Kingdom, as reported in medical news today.com. The study was published in the British Medical Journal.

Three studies were used in compiling the findings. They were the Nurses’ Health Study of 1984-2008, the Nurses’ Health Study II of 1991-2009 and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study of 1986-2008.

There were a total of 187,382 people involved in the studies. Those who had diabetes, cancer or heart disease before the trials were not eligible to be participants.

Every four years participants had to complete a questionnaire about the kinds of food eaten. Ten fruits were used in the study: apples or pears; grapes or raisins; bananas; peaches, apricots or plums; cantaloupe; prunes; grapefruit; oranges; blueberries and strawberries.

Researchers from Harvard School of Public Health were involved in the studies, according to the guardian.com. The disease affects more than three million people in Great Britain alone.

The study found that those who ate three standard-sized portions of blueberries had a 26 percent less chance of developing diabetes. Those who had grapes or raisins had a 12 percent less chance of getting the disease. Those who ate pears and apples reduced their risk by seven percent, and those who ate prunes cut their risk by 11percent.

Those who ate some kinds of fruit, such as peaches, apricots, bananas and plums did not cut their risk of getting diabetes by any noticeable amount, according to the study. On the other hand, drinking fruit juice actually increased the risk by eight percent.

The study found that replacing fruit juice with fruits cut the risk of getting diabetes dramatically. Those who changed to grape juice cut their risk by 33 percent. Those who changed to raisins and grapes reduced the risk by 19 percent. In addition, those who changed to apples and pears cut their risk by 14 percent; those who changed to bananas cut their risk by 13 percent and those who changed to grapefruit saw their risk lessened by 12 percent.

According to the nydailynews.com, the health of participants was monitored closely during the tests. About 6.5 percent of participants developed diabetes.